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Newly Granted College and High School LPFMs are Next Wave of Student Broadcasters

Last week the FCC began granting new LPFM applications and so far, it has granted several applications for new LPFM college, high school, and middle school radio stations. I profiled two of the college stations, Washington College and York Technical College, in College Radio Survivor on Friday and in this post I will run through the remaining school-affiliated applications that were granted last week.

The latest college grantee, the Board of Regents for University of Wisconsin, intends to utilize LPFM at its University of Wisconsin, Parkside campus. The new license, which was applied for in Kenosha, will allow the school’s student-run Internet-only radio station WIPZ (aka Ranger Radio) to broadcast over low power FM. According to its application, existing radio station WIPZ airs a range of programming, including “rock, metal, hip hop, techno, and jazz shows along with a variety of talk shows ranging from sports, to current events, wrestling, and gaming.”

Another organization, the International Metaphysical Ministry, which is doing business under the name University of Sedona, was granted its LPFM application for a new radio station in Sedona, Arizona. According to its application, the station will “…feature talk shows with students and faculty” and will also air lectures, “inspirational” music programming, and programming related to “the benefits of mind, body and spirit practices.”

Considering the number of high school-related LPFM applicants, it’s not surprising that we’re already starting to see some licenses granted at high schools and school districts. So far, no fewer than seven secondary (and middle) schools have been granted LPFM applications for new stations. Although high school radio stations have been around for decades, there aren’t as many stations located on middle school campuses. For that reason, It’s pretty neat to see that Broad Creek Middle School was granted its LPFM application (PDF).

According to the application filed by license holder Carteret County Schools in Newport, North Carolina, the new station will teach Broad Creek Middle School students about broadcasting by allowing them to get hands-on experience in programming, engineering, recording, production, and possibly management. The application states, “We plan to broadcast our school sports events live because many parents work and cannot make it to the games at 4pm. Also we plan to offer classical and jazz music for calming classroom environments campus wide. We also plan to broadcast school news, student programs, and any school delays (weather..etc.). Our students will take part in every aspect of this process and will experience the stress and pressure of deadlines, expectations, and will learn to handle it in stride as well.”

Vacaville Christian Schools in Vacaville, California plans to augment its Broadcasting and Performing Arts program with the addition of a LPFM radio station. The school’s music program is called the Radio Conservatory as an homage to the long history of radio symphony orchestras and to signal its close connection with existing campus online radio station VCS Radio. Its application states that the station will “give a greater voice to students preparing their talents for a career in media broadcasting and communications.” The campus already houses production studios and holds audio production classes. The planned-for station (to be called KVCB) will feature talk shows, live student sports broadcasts, lectures, coverage of civic meetings, and performances by student music groups, actors, and composers.

Additionally, Dickson County Schools in Dickson, Tennessee was granted its LPFM application. The district states in its application that it plans to construct a radio station at Dickson County High School in order to “…enhance the communications program” and “…give students the ability to learn broadcast operations in a real world setting and better prepare for college.”

Chilton County Board of Education was also granted its LPFM license for Clanton, Alabama. According to its application, the proposed station will be a “…student run/student operated station at the LeCroy Career Technical Center” and “will be incorporated into the center’s media resource and electronics curriculum.”

Mitchell County High School in Camilla, Georgia was granted its application for a new LPFM station. According to its application, the station will air a mix of news, public affairs, school events, sports, and music programming. Students will get the opportunity to “create programming for a regular show or shows” and a planned-for studio will “include space for educating students and volunteers” about on-air skills as well as radio production.

Warrick County School System in Boonville, Indiana plans to utilize its newly granted LPFM application in order to build a studio at Boonville High School. Its application states that the station will enhance the “communication program,” which currently includes “basic broadcast training in radio and TV.”

LPFM applicant Wayne High School in Wayne, West Virginia was also given the nod by the FCC. In its application, Wayne High School states that the new LPFM station will give students “hands-on experience, managing and operating…a broadcast station” and that “the station will function as a teaching laboratory.” The school plans to add broadcasting, media, and journalism classes and the station itself is expected to air music, public affairs, news, and sports programming.

In its LPFM application, Worth County High School in Sylvester, Georgia states that as part of its educational offerings, it has a “broadcast video production pathway” and is providing internet streams of sporting events. The application states, “For those community members without internet access, the idea of low power FM was suggested so that community stakeholders  could be served. Students will have the opportunity to interact with parents and other community members and provide local news, sports, and other events.” The high school currently offers broadcasting classes and operates online radio station RamRadio.

DayStar Adventist Academy in Castle Valley, Utah is a private boarding school for 9th to 12th graders. Affiliated with the 7th Day Adventist Church, it plans to utilize its LPFM station to spread its religious mission and to educate students. Its application states that the station “…will provide opportunities for students to gain hands-on experience in radio broadcasting…Via radio the school will better reach out to the surrounding community with Truth and Love, seeking to bring the same hope, joy and understanding lived by students and staff on campus. Not only will the station broadcast Bible teaching, but will provide educational programming along the lines of preventative health, the family and child rearing, history, science, the arts and literature…Our goal is to share our total Christian lifestyle with our neighbors…”

We will continue to keep an eye on all of the newly granted LPFM applications and are posting regular updates every Thursday in LPFM Watch.


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  1. College and High School LPFMs are Next Wave of ... - January 22, 2014

    […] by Jennifer WaitsJan. 22, 2014 Last week the FCC began granting new low power FM applications and in the mix are numerous future high school and college radio stations. I profiled two of the college stations, Washington College and York Technical College, in College Radio Survivoron Friday and in this post I will run through the remaining school-affiliated applications that were granted last week. The latest college grantee, the Board of Regents for University of Wisconsin, intends to utilize LPFM at its University of Wisconsin, Parkside campus. The new license, which was applied for in Kenosha, will allow the school’s student-run Internet-only radio station WIPZ (aka Ranger Radio) to broadcast over low power FM. According to its application, existing radio station WIPZ airs a range of programming, including “rock, metal, hip hop, techno, and jazz shows along with a variety of talk shows ranging from sports, to current events, wrestling, and gaming.” More here: http://www.radiosurvivor.com/2014/01/22/newly-granted-college-and-high-school-lpfms-are-next-wave-of-student-broadcasters/  […]

  2. College and High School LPFMs are Next Wave of ... - March 11, 2014

    […] Last week the FCC began granting new LPFM applications and so far, it has granted several applications for new LPFM college, high school, and middle school radio stations. I profiled two of the college stations, Washington College and York Technical College, in College Radio Survivor on Friday and in this post I will run through the remaining school-affiliated applications that were granted last week.  […]

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