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Podcast 31 - 13th Hour for Webcasters

Podcast #31 – It’s the 13th Hour for Small Webcasters


It’s the 13th hour for small webcasters, as broadcasters and supporters scramble to find a solution to new performance royalty rates that threaten to put hundreds, or even thousands of stations out of business. If that many small community or commercial broadcasters were about to go under, there most certainly would be a loud public outcry. But the crisis facing this segment of independent broadcasting is falling outside the spotlight.

We talk with Paul Merrell of StreamLicensing.com, a service that manages royalty payments for webcasters, to learn how that company is addressing the issue. Then we review efforts that are underway to bring awareness of the issue and perhaps encourage a compromise between small internet stations and music copyright holders.

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Show Notes:

  • Live365 to Broadcasters: We’re Shutting Down Jan. 31
  • StreamLicensing.com
  • Podcast #29 – Will 2016 Be the End of Indie Internet Radio?
  • Why American Independent Internet Radio May Go Extinct in 2016
  • RadioDiversity.org
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    One Response to Podcast #31 – It’s the 13th Hour for Small Webcasters

    1. RK Henderson January 28, 2016 at 4:09 pm #

      Simply a fabulous feat of journalism on the American small webcaster crisis! My compliments to the whole team. I’m flacking you hard on Net Radio Blog (http://netradioblog.blogspot.com/) and in the Internet Radio Broadcasting Facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/internetradiobroadcasting/).

      One point that remains to be made: this is really an American problem. Many headlines refer to “the death of Internet radio”, but nothing of sort is happening. It’s _American_ Net radio that’s going away. At issue is not whether humanity will have webcasting (that’s already well settled), but whether Americans will own any of it.

      Also, will the American public be listening to American stations in future, or will all their sources be foreign? This was already a big problem in the US before this decision; I currently have 40 Net-only music stations in my scan list. Only 3 of them are American. (Down from 5 in December, thanks to the recent CRB decision.)

      My point is that US laws were already obstructive to the development of the new industry; the CRB decision represents a firm step away from the national interest.

      Thanks again for the great podcast!

      Robin
      Net Radio Blog
      http://netradioblog.blogspot.com/

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