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Ham radio alive and well in Bernal Heights, San Francisco

Today Radio Survivor contributor Bob Mason and I were taking a stroll through Holly Park in the Bernal Heights neighborhood of San Francisco. Suddenly we ran into Art, who had set up a complete amateur radio setup on a park bench and table. The following brief interview ensued:

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3 Responses to Ham radio alive and well in Bernal Heights, San Francisco

  1. DereK Hoyle October 24, 2011 at 8:18 pm #

    Yes, Ham Radio alive and well the World

    over, and has so many facets one can follow that it may

    appear overwhelming to new licensees.

    I’d hoped your reporter would have interviewed Art at

    more length so those who don’t know very much about

    Ham Radio (Amateur Radio) might

    have had their interest piqued enough to perhaps pursue it

    further.

    I’ve been involved in broadcast radio for 30 years

    (College, Community, Commercial), mostly as a music

    programmer and studio technician, and also as occasional

    talk show host, V/O work, and produce a little News now and again, but Ham Radio offers me

    an outlet for my technical side that one just can’t get in broadcast radio unless one is a Broadcast Engineer.

    I can design a build my own antennas and equipment and

    experiment with some of the more esoteric modes of voice

    and digital communication technology’s in a way only

    possible if one were employed by a large corporation or

    University, and even then, I wouldn’t have the freedom to

    experiment like I do now as an FCC Licensed Radio Amateur.

    I live in a remote Northern California Coastal town subject to earthquakes and tsunamis, so my main interests lie in Emergency Communications utilizing the VHF bands, but I also have other “fun” Ham related interests as well.

    The current FCC Licensing regulations DON’T require Morse Code, so now it’s merely a matter of studying the Licensing materials to pass the (quite easy) written test, and a new world of communications is open to you.

    Amateur Radio, try it, you might like it.

    73, KE6EBZ

  2. JAMES KALUNA January 21, 2012 at 10:43 am #

    I NEED TO TEST A REFLECTIVE FREQUENCY LISTENING DEVICE THAT SHOULD OPERATE AT 8-10.6 MHz. I WOULD LIKE TO HIRE SOMEONE TO SEND A SIGNAL AND TELL ME IF THEY CAN HEAR ANYTHING. DO YOU KNOW ANYONE? THANKS. –

  3. Martin October 12, 2012 at 10:50 pm #

    The only band in that spectrum for amateur radio is from 10.1 to 10.150 MHz. Also known as, 30 meters. That is only 50 Khz. The band is limited to 200 watts PEP, with RTTY or DATA. Morse Code, etc. I do not think lasers or light technology is allowed. I could be wrong. Also an amateur radio operator cannot work for pay using amateur radio. We, as amateur radio operators, are also the “primary users” of that spectrum, in the USA. No one can cause interference to our service there. In order to get a license for 30 meters, you would have to have at least a General Class license. Not as easy to get as the Technician license.

    73,

    Marty

    KG6QKJ

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